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in the morning, and at the end of the day, they're dead. >> with them, street to stree, as they fight assad's army. >> we are returning now, after the attack. it just shows you how brave they are, and at the same time, how disorganized they are. >> guardicorrespondent for frontlinghaith abdul-ahad, takes you inside the battle for syria. and later tonight, the regime responds. >> the regime now is bombarding civilian neighborhoods with artillery, with tank fire, and with fighter bombers. >> how is president bashar al-assad holding on to power? >> the iranians are gaining influence in syria now by the day. >> and what will happen if asd falls? >> there is definitely increasing worry in the united states administration about in whose hands these weapons are falling. >> these two stories on this special edition frontline. >> frontline is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. majofundinis provided by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant and
, 70,000 have been killed since protests against syrian president assad. robert frod testified at a robert ford testified at a hearing. this is two hours and 15 minutes. >> this hearing will come to order. we need to review the syrian crisis. it was two years ago last week on the nightly news that we saw those protesters walking through the street, chanting, peaceful. what the world saw next without the syrian forces opened up with small arms fire on the marchers. over the ensuing weeks, that was followed by materially -- artillery barrage is and tanks and aerial apartment and finally i scud missiles into cities. we are now two years into that syria and uprising. for two leady years, u.s. policy has been a drift. the obama administration saw assad as a reformer in the works. then it bet on moscow to play a constructive role. this is the assad who is bombing villages in syria. this is the assad who is ordering teenagers tortured. frankly, he is engaged in murdering his populist. the ancient city is now in ruins. 70,000 syrians are dead. a million refugees has spilled into neighb
the assad regime in syria, allowing the over flights by iran. now, if so, that raises serious questions about u.s./iraqi relations going forward. secretary kerry met with iraqi prime minister malkey in his unannounced stroz baghdad today. and those iranian flights were at the top of the agend a. the secretary and the prime minister had a private meeting that kerry described as a spirited discussion. when it was over, the secretary told reporters, quote, anything that supportings president assad is problematic. i made it very clear to the prime minister that the overflights from iran are in fact helping to discontinue president osaud and his regime. thez believes the iranian aircraft flying over iraq are carrying weapons to help arm the syrian government, although it rawn insists it is humanitarian aid. the u.s. has asked iraq to force the planes to land in iraq for inspections. but only a few have been checked. they have long been a point of conflict between the and u.s. iraq. >> the intent here, fwy going public, is to increase the pressure on al-malma laki. but it shows how minimal ou
and the syrian opposition to haste and assad'shasten the end of rule. he has lost his lead agency -- .etters --legitimacy to rule we have been clear that the use of chemical weapons against the syrian people would be a serious and tragic mistake. we also share israel's raid concerned about the transfer of chemical or other weapons to terrorists, like has the law, -- like hezbollah, which might be used against israel. finally, we continue consultation on iran. we agree that a nuclear armed iran would be a threat to the and israel.he world we agree on our goal -- we do not have a policy of containment when it comes to a nuclear iraq. our policy is to prevent iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon. we prefer to resolve this diplomatically. there is still time to do so. must understand the need to meet their international obligations. international community will increase the pressure on the iranian government. the united states will continue to work closely with israel on steps. i will repeat -- all options are on the table. we will do what is necessary to prevent iran from getting those weapons.
. that's >>> ten years before we failed to find chemical weapons in iraq, bashir al assad is using weapons in syria. >>> tonight you're going to hear from the roommate of a campus killer. he came face to face, eye to eye. he lived to tell about it. possibly prevent the murder of other students. plus, congresswoman michele bachmann, now she claimed that president obama's wasting your money on his lavish lifestyle. where exactly is she getting her information? where are her facts? we tracked her down today and asked her and wait until you see how she responded. we begin with breaking news, news that could, could just trigger military action by the united states in syria. the news tonight, the possibility that the regime in syria, which has already shown itself capable of doing almost anything to its own people, might be doing the one thing that triggers military action, might be, might be using chemical weapons. crossing a red line that president obama himself laid down. they have, they have used chemical weapons, that would leave the president with a major challenge as he heads toni
to publicly call on assad to step down because of the horrific violence being inflicted on the syrian people. jordan has played a leading role in trying to begin a political transition toward a new government. we're working together to strengthen a credible syrian opposition. we share jordan's concerns about violence spilling across the borders. so i want to take this opportunity to make it clear the united states is committed to the security of jordan, which is backed by our strong alliance. as has been mentioned during this crisis the jordanian people have displayed extraordinary generosity, but the strains of so many refugees inevitably is showing. every day -- to neighbors far from home, but this is a heavy burden. and the international community needs to step up to make sure that they are helping to shoulder this burden. the united states will certainly do our part. we are already the single largest donor of humanitarian assistance to the syrian people. some of this has helped people here in jordan. and today i'm announcing that my administration will work with congress to provide jorda
has resigned. the founder of the rebel-free syrian army, the main group challenging the assad regime seriously injured in a car bombing. a number of developments here as we welcome you to whole new week here on "america's newsroom.". i'm bill hemmer. martha has time for the family. >> i'm heather childers, nice to be here again. secretary of state john kerry is in the middle east. he is urging iraq to stop letting iran use its airspace to shuttle weapons and soldiers to the syrian government >> for those of us engaged in the effort to see president assad step down and a see a democratic process take hold with a transitional government government according to the geneva communique, for those of us engaged in that effort, anything that supports president assad is problematic. bill: so iran claims the flights contain humanitarian supplies. conor powell in the middle east bureau in jerusalem. first of all who is behind the car bomb, the car bomb hit on the rebel commander? >> reporter: so often is the case, bill, really tough to get accurate information coming out of syria. but it is not
supporting a vast expansion in the flow of weapons to syrian rebels fighting president bashar al-assad. the new york times reports the airlift of arms and equipment to the rebels, largely overseen by turkey, has massively increased since early 2012 to include more than 160 flights in jordanian, saudi and qatari planes. u.s. intelligence officers have helped shop for weapons and have vetted rebel groups to decide who gets the arms. the cia's covert backing comes despite the obama administration's public support for solely non-lethal aid to the rebels. meanwhile, the cia has further increased its role in syria by feeding intelligence to rebel fighters for use against the syrian government. the wall street journal reports the move comes as part of the u.s. effort to tamp down on islamist militants in syria by aiding secular forces. secretary of state john kerry has urged iraq to take action to stop iranian flights carrying arms to the al-assad regime to iraqi airspace. john kerry made the comments during a surprise visit to baghdad where he met with iraqi prime minister of maliki. >> i ma
simply aren't going to improve the situation. the colonel assad is reportedly in stable condition in turkey after an assassination attempt. he was one of the original founders of the free syrian army but has been somewhat marge alized in recent months. colonel assad has never been able to unite the many different groups fighting the syrian regime of the the attack on his life happened while he was touring a rebel area. there is the possibility that there is internal rebel politics at play though syrian rebels blame syria and the assad government for the attack. in another blow to the opposition, the leading opposition figure, katabi offered his resignation yesterday but it was rejected by rebel leaders. on facebook he said he was resigning due to restrictions on his work. the overall inner workings of the syrian opposition is really, really complicated. as actual fighters fighting in syria simply don't report to the syrian leadership and jenna, this really does remain a fragmented syrian opposition and two years into the civil war, it hasn't really improve many in the internationa
further and said that if assad crosses it there will be, quote, consequences. he has said you will be held accountable. today his chief of staff said on cnn that it would be a game changer if, in fact, chemical weapons were used. now the president has not specified what he means exactly when he says assad or his regime would be held accountable. there have been reports that the u.s. has developed a plan for direct action against syria, but there's no indication the president is pursuant. let's be realistic. it's hard to imagine that the u.s. would take any direction action to syria when the president is visiting the neighborhood here in israel in less than 24 hours, anderson. >> marine one has just landed at andrews air force base. there you see it happening. again, the president will surely be getting on air force one heading toward israel. jessica, the president as you said is in the region. it does add pressure to the president's trip, particularly in israel if, in fact, chemical weapons have been used in neighboring syria. >> reporter: absolutely. syria was always going to be a part of
publicly that assad of syria has to go. that was a choice that he made. one would assume that declaring it publicly involves a commitment by the united states which the united states is prepared then to make effective. and that, therefore, we have the means and the strategy for achieving that objective. it soon turned out that this was a rhetorical commitment without a real capacity for follow through on our part. so we went to the u.n., and we demanded that the u.n. security council support us on this. not surprisingly, the russians and the chinese said, well, we don't share this conclusion, and we're not going to join you in forcing assad out, and we object, and the resolution failed. we thereupon denounced the russians and chinese as having engaged in a stance that is infantile and disgusting, those were the words used by our ambassador to the u.n. which is not a way of soliciting their support for further -- [laughter] further common policy. on top of it, it became increasingly clear that the opposition to assad is very mixed. some of it involves some of our friends who are sponsori
sunni supporters of president bashar al-assad. clerk was preaching in a mosque when the bomb went off, sheikh mohammad al-bouti. he was well-known in in syria for his televised sermons. the head of the kurdish militant group, the pkk, called for peace with turkey. he is in a turkish jail, but his statement was read out to supporters. >> we are at the point where weapons should be silenced, and ideas should be spoken. a new era has begun. >> he called for his fighters to pull out of turkey. he has been engaged in months for talks -- four months in talks with the turkish government. >> i think this is a very positive approach. it is a very positive appeal. what is most important is how far this will be of limited -- implement it. >> -- implemented. >> if it holds, it will mean the end to 30 years of fighting. >> lebanon's government decided to step down after a standoff with hezbollah. the prime minister had been in office for over two years. hezbollah had helped put him in office, but they fell out over domestic issues. there were also tensions over neighboring syria. hezbollah strongl
ahmadinejad of iran and bashar .l-assad of syria >> i'm confident that assad will go. it's not a question of if, it's when. and so part of what we have to spend a lot of time thinking about is what's the aftermath of that and how does that work in a way that actually serves the syrian people? gwen: and today he did some hand-holding with the leaders of jordan and turkey as well. not too much on his plate this week, guys. what was this trip designed to accomplish? >> the first thing was to seal up this perception that president obama has not had israel's interests front and center, and he seemed to succeed at that. in heretz this morning, they wrote, the most powerful man in the world arrived in the most threatened state in the world to promise love. hebrew, noted he spoke how much hebrew he used. and then at the end of his visit, brokered a phone call between prime minister netanyahu and the president of turkey, two countries that have been estranged since a turkish boat on the way to help gaza was attacked by israeli commandos? gwen: so, tom, is this like woody allen says, 90% of life is
. >>> we have breaking news tonight. ten years after we found chemical weapons in iraq, ba bassar al assad could possibly using the chemical weapons that we know he has right now. >> you're going to hear from one very brave and lucky young man tonight. >> plus congresswoman michelle bamman, she claims that president obama is wasting her money on his lavish lifestyle. where is she getting her facts? we tracked her down and asked her to see how she responded. basically, she wouldn't stop walking or running, almost. keeping them honest. we begin now with breaking news. news that just triggered military action by the united states in syria. the news tonight that the possibility that the regime in syria might be doing the one thing that could trigger american military action. might be using chemical weapons. crossing a redline that president obama himself lay down. now, they have used chemical weapons, that would leave the president with a major challenge as he heads tonight to israel. now, the suggestion that chemical weapons might have been used came a few hours ago today from mike rogers, sa
is worried what will happen in the country of the deadly assad regime is out. president obama's comments came of the president assad pledged to wipe out forces of darkness from his country, following the reports of a suicide has' last night at a damascus mosque, including a cleric who supported the syrian regime. this is the first time in thesive war that a suicide bomber has struck inside a house of worship, and the sunni cleric who was injured -- or killed, reportedly the most senior religious figure killed in the entirety of the conflict. president assad vowed revenge. we will destroy their extremism until we have cleansed the country. little doubt the syrian leader is referring to the rebel fighters. the opposition denying anything to do with the attack. ed henry is with the president. >>> ed, president obama is under a lot of pressure to take some military action in syria. >> that's right, including from some fellow democrats, who like carl levin, if not boots on the ground, at least a no-fly zone. senator levin and joining senator john mccain there could be surgical astrikes. the presid
are already the single largest donor of humanitarian assistance to the syrian people. i'm confident that assad will go. it is not a question of if. it is when. and so part of what we have to spend a lot of time thinking about is what is the aftermath? for the american people we have to recognize we have a stake here. >> a half million syrian refugees have fled to jordan. a nation already dependent on foreign aid including $13 billion from the u.s. king abdullah says assad's days are numbers but fears islam rule could emerge in its place. chuck todd is traveling with the president and asking the president as many questions as he wants. that's how chuck todd gets down. chuck, i have one question for you. what is going on in your world right now? >> well, it has been a pretty busy day. you brought up the issue of syria and this is classic all politics is local issue when it comes to jordan. this issue of syrian refugees and the economic toll it is taking on the country is clearly the number one item on the king's agenda. he equated it. he made an interesting little parallel. he said they may get
, president bashar al-assad and his associates are resorting increasingly with other indiscriminate capabilities that terrorize innocent syrians and increase further the flow of refugees out of syria. former secretary panetta discussed the possibility of more robust options for military support last year. and he agreed to bring this matter to his counterparts in brussels. the recent decisions by the french and the british that provided assistance directly to the syrian opposition suggests that the position and nato is by no means unified. admiral come i hope you will provide us with some concept of our current thinking compared to that of our european partnerships, as it relates to syria and possible additional roles for the alliance beyond the deployment. eucom responsibilities include managing military engagement and cooperation, including through the nato and russia council. this includes russia's cooperation with the coalition equipment out of afghanistan, along the northern distribution network through russia and over 110 military to military activities between our two militari
. >> the violence is not going to stop unless and until assad understands that he can't shoot his way out of, this that the better course of action, if he wants to save his country is to allow a transition to better government. >> this new amateur video out of syria while impossible to authenticate shows the fighting apparently raging in key centers including homes in damascus. as a leader of the main syrian rebel group is throwing his support behind the formation of an interim government whose leader may be tomorrow in istanbul, turkey, shep. >> shepard: nations have long avoided during this conflict the idea of sending weapons directly to the rebels. that's changed or no? >> it seems to have changed. at a news conference with the australian foreign minister a short time ago. secretary of state john kerry really opened the door stating the u.s. does not stand in the way of other countries, whether it's france or britain or anyone else who wants to it arm the opposition. >> so as long as the president assad continues to attack his own people with scuds, with aircraft, with tanks, there is an
his own reasons for wanting to have assad in power. is a kinship between shia and alouites, is a concern that if his government is toppled it puts pressure on sectarian tensions within their record to help us understand why the maliki government is taking the position it is, regarding the conflict in syria. >> you look for simple explanations. many international jihadis entered iraq and committed acts. whether they facilitated or not, they did not stop it. in 2009 after a particular set of horrific bombings, maliki wanted to take them to a criminal court. it looks like rushing, when people see an uprising in spirit, it looks like iraq in 1990, 1991. how did this come about? --is simplistic to say that more the issue is maliki and shia is they must see the threat facing them in the same way that iran sees the threat, and by the threats, i mean this fear of the sunni regime's getting together, coming together to overthrow the shia regime of assad and then overthrowing the shia regime in baghdad. is this fear of the alternative. it is fear is assad is on the turn, that people
to the syrian army through iraqi air space. >> anything that supports president assad is problematic. and i made it very clear to the prime minister that the overflights from iran are, in fact, helping to sustain president assad. there are members of congress and people in america who increasingly are watching what iraq is doing, and wondering how it is that a partner in the efforts for democracy and a partner for whom americans feel they have tried so hard to be helpful, how that country can be, in fact, doing something that makes it more difficult to achieve our common goals. >> nbc's mike taibbi is live for us in akabul, afghanistan. mike, let's talk. this is not a photo op. this is some tough talk from john kerry. how is it being received? >> well, it has been tough talk from secretary of state john kerry, and you wonder how spirited the discussions are going to be with afghan president hamid karzai. they're meeting and now there will be a joint press conference later. the two men know each other. kerry has made five previous trips here when he was a senator. but there have been strained rel
before assad goes. jessica yellin is live from amman, jordan where that press conference just wrapped. jessica, the president said assad would go but sounded perhaps a little annoyed about being asked how that might happen. why was he seemingly annoyed? >> well, jake, we counted and this is the sixth time that the president or a member of his administration has said assad must go just in the last month alone. but none of them has laid out a plan or a path for direct action by the united states to help remove assad from power. without any direct military intervention by the u.s. the president knows he is vulnerable to criticism. that he is standing by while a massacre is taking place and that is a particularly sharp and poignant charge when he is standing here in jordan where they are providing refuge to some 7,000 syrians who are fleeing for safety every day. some 7,000 people crossing the border into jordan from syria each day because of the violence there. >> i believe the king abdullah of jordan said that the settlements of refugees now form something like the fifth largest town in
join the effort of others to arm the opposition? how long will assad stay in power? that changes on almost a day-to-day basis because the situation is so uncertain as it enters the third year. the president is a bit defensive because people ask where was the world's biggest super power? you are supposed to be the voice of humanitarian needs around the world. how could you let this go on so long? why haven't you done more? the president said today at the news conference the united states from the start was calling on assad to step down and we know if you look at the calendar it is simply not true. many other countries were ahead of the united states in calling for assad to step down but it's a tough one for the president. he is right in the sense the united states used military force in this region from the beginning, there is still a big hangover from the iraq war in this part of the world. it would have been controversial. all the choices are difficult. he does get a bit defensive when that question is posed, wolf. >> he certainly does at least that is the impression you get fro
war continues to rage on, president bashar al-assad and his associates are resorting increasingly with other indiscriminate capabilities that terrorize innocent syrians and increase further the flow of refugees out of syria. former secretary panetta discussed the possibility of more robust options for military support last year. and he agreed to bring this matter to his counterparts in brussels. the recent decisions by the french and the british that provided assistance directly to the syrian opposition suggests that the position and nato is by no means unified. admiral come i hope you will provide us with some concept of our current thinking compared to that of our european partnerships, as it relates to syria and possible additional roles for the alliance beyond the deployment. eucom responsibilities include managing military engagement and cooperation, including through the nato and russia council. this includes russia's cooperation with the coalition equipment out of afghanistan, along the northern distribution network through russia and over 110 military to military activitie
's a long standing syria through the decline or democrat myself of the assad regime, which i think is inevitable, will be a serious blow to iran. >> so if you have washington, sir, on one side of the scale and tehran on the other, who does baghdad more closely align with? >> well, our hope is, of course, that it will be a truly democratic regime which will be primarily loyal to the interests of the people in iraq and that their views will be consistent with others in supporting and strengthening democratic institutions. but as with many of the other countries in the middle east, there are a whole series of conflicting interests there and it will play out over a long period of time. but our interest is in democratic institutions, democratic societies who will serve their people and not be so much interested in the kinds of conflicts that have raged for so long in that region. >> you mentioned your hopes are for the inevitable assad regime there in syria. but today one of the national coalition, the head of that resigned. he was the key u.s. ally among the rebels. how big of a blow i
distress over the king of the assad regime. they are more relaxed about that. a much more relaxed about egypt. u.s. orof believing the "-- will reorder the middle east, i find that this is a sober kind of summit, about what is doable, and what is not doable. there is a lot about the new israeli government, which i am happy to discuss in the question and answer. thank you very much. >> thank you. mike? >> thank you. it is good to be doing this. it is good to be on this panel with my colleagues. one of the great strengths about the washington institute, which makes it so nice to work here, to have colleagues like dennis are a greatho source of wisdom on this topic. my dearest to have hd screens to have to watch me watch -- what to watch me eat lunch. we begin these things by saying, welcome mr. secretary, members of congress. nobody knows auntie be any different. [laughter] that is the benefit of live stream. i was asked to do this in part because the last presidential trip to the middle east, rather to israel, was not by president obama, but by president bush. worked for him at the time.
. but maliki has his own reasons for wanting to have assad in power. is it the kinship between shia and alouites, is it a concern that if his government is toppled it puts pressure on sectarian tensions within iraq? help us understand why the maliki government is taking the position it is, regarding the conflict in syria. >> you look for simple explanations. many international jihadis entered iraq and committed acts. whether they facilitated or not, they did not stop it. in 2009 after a particular set of horrific bombings, maliki wanted to take them to a criminal court. it looks like saddam's regime, when people see an uprising in syria, it looks like iraq in 1990, 1991. how did this come about? it is simplistic to say that -- more the issue is maliki and shia is they must see the threat facing them in the same way that iran sees the threat, and by the threats, i mean this fear of the sunni regime's getting together, coming together to overthrow the shia regime of assad and then overthrowing the shia regime in baghdad. it is this fear of the alternative. it is fear is assad is on th
civil war, to the north. the king was the first arab leader to call on bashar al- assad to go, and is cooperating with the u.s. and others to make that happen. jordan reportedly hosts u.s. and other special forces training the ragtag syrian rebels. but the pressures come from a flood of syrian refugees. some 460,000 now, housed in squalid refugee camps, and the numbers keep growing. >> how are you going to turn back women, children and the wounded? this is something that we just can't do. it's not the jordanian way. the problem is obviously the burden it's having on jordan. we've tried to quantify it as much as possible. the latest figure says it's going to cost roughly $550 million a year. not only is that a problem, but it's going to be a tremendous strain, obviously, on infrastructure, and it's creating social problems and security problems. >> warner: there are strains on jordan too from the fact an estimated half of all jordanians are palestinians from the west bank. so king abdullah has long urged the u.s. to get re-engaged in trying to bring peace between israelis and p
is having some strategic distress over, you know, the, you know, the king of the assad regime. more relaxed about that just as more relaxed about egypt and in syria i find a much more limited sort of agenda than i would have thought going in much, instead of believing the u.s. will somehow reorder the middle east to israel's liking i find this is sober kind of a summit, what is doable and what is not doable. a lot of stuff about the new israeli government which i'm happy to discuss in the q&a. this gives you a bit of a sense how you see things. thank you all very much. >> thank you, dave. very good. turn to mike singh. >> thanks a lot, rob. good to be doing this and it's, good to be on this panel with my colleagues. one of the great strengths about the washington institute and one of the things which makes it so nice to work here is to have colleagues like david and dennis and ambassador jeffrey who are here and great source of wisdom on this topic. i should also start by apologizing to our viewers who have hd screens who had to watch me eat lunch at the beginning. one of the downsides of t
massacre of the syrian people by president assad. fortunately, the nuclear capacity was destroyed. unfortunately, the arsenal of chemical weapons remain. we cannot -- those weapons to fall in the terrorist hands. it could lead to an epic tragedy. there was an attempt to bring spring to the arab world. it is an arab choice, it is an arab initiative. it may bring peace to the region, freedom to the people, economic growth to the upstates. if realized, it can lead to a better tomorrow. we pray it will become a reality. i believe the real division is between skeptics and those who believe in peace. your voice will encourage belief. you came to us with a clear message that no one should let skepticism win the day. a vision that says clearly that peace is not only a wish but a possibility. i fully support your call. there is no other way to make the future better. there's no better leader to make it possible. your visit is an historic step in that direction. we shall journey with you all the way. thank you. >> thank you so much. well, thank you, president peres for your very generous wo
in syria, the iranian regime supporting the regime of bashar al assad. there are widespread reports that iranian weapons go through iraq on the way to the syrian army. you're there in baghdad. what are you seeing and hearing as far as the iraqi government's position towards the war in syria? >> reporter: the iraqi government claims it is holding a neutral position, neither supporting one side or the other, although it is still continuing to allow according to the u.s. ambassador to iraq iranian flights of weaponry, refusing to investigate and search planes that are travel through iraqi air space. they tell u.s. officials when questioned about it that the iranian manifest says it is humanitarian supplies and therefore planes don't need to be searched, and the iraqi government is concerned about what's happening in syria, worried there will be some sort of spillover effect when it comes to the situation in iraq, the prime minister himself has said that as well. at the end of the day, the iraqi government right now continues to make the calculation it is in the iraqi government's best
, egypt, turkey, qatar, it could be as these anti-assad countries sort of alie under one banner -- >> she's right on that. the israelis, the turks, they're all very concerned about this. but i also think we don't know who the opposition is. yes, there are bad actors -- >> we can shape that. >> right. we have no equity, no investment, no shaping, no nothing, we don't really know them. and the fact that all of these bad guys are there, is because of the vacuum that has been created -- exactly. >> you make an excellent point. netanyahu doesn't go around apologizing. >> i'm surprised he did. >> he's not a big -- he realized that israel and turkey have a common, dire problem, the threat of syrian chemical weapons. he had to swallow his pride and say, i'm going to work with this guy on this. >> brought down off the ledge. >> we only have a couple of minutes left. ron, you're and economic expert here, i want to talk for just a minute about cyprus, the idea that tiny nation could set off shock waves for the entire global economy is amazing to a lot of people. on the other hand, when you hear one
for your thank you. >> thank you. >> let me do a little follow-up. if and when assad falls, you talked about ethnic cleansing. the have contingency plans to deal with the syrian stockpile of weapons? comm does not. anythingu tell us about that? >> not on a non-classified level. >> thank you very much. senator mccain had an interesting question with regard to patriot batteries in turkey. who put those there? mission and on nato assigned by the nato alliance. is there. states place inn a southwestern turkey along the border. reachedhis a decision ?y the nato leadership >> it was a native decision in this was a nato mission. those are the nations that contributed the actual batteries, the 28 member nations have people who are part of this. command and control is made up from people from all the different companies -- different countries, but it's very much a nato mission. >> what does it take for nato to make that decision? >> we had to bring it to the nato council, which is 28 nations represented by ambassadors in belgium. it was discussed there and then the ambassadors went back to capi
of saudi arabia have been clamped down because it doesn't serve u.s. interest. >> what assad has done in syria is way worse than what's happening. >> no. let's not equalize them. but it's to make clear that the u.s. doesn't necessarily step in. >> it makes strategic calculations about what its interests are. but in the case of syria the worrying thing about the situation in syria, the first wave of this, particularly tunisia which was entirely nonviolent, the egyptian revolt which was nonviolent although skirmishes and different forms of violence, to the syrian movement which began as nonviolent and faced such massive brutal horrific massacres has armed themselves and has become a long bloody civil war that has profound regional consequences and fear of spilling out and hezbollah looms large. >> wish we had more historical depth how we look at this. this is the third arab state to be devastated by a civil war. without pointing fingers of blame, lebanon for 15 years was devastated by civil war. foreign armies, foreign intelligence services. after the u.s. invasion in 2003 iraq went thr
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